Category Archives: Teaching

Work Freedom Summit 2019. Did you miss it?

The thing with online summits is you only get free access for a limited period of time. Depending on your schedule, you may not get to listen to all the sessions you planned to. I know that happened to me with the Work Freedom Summit this week. 

On Thursday, I enjoyed Getting Started with Blogging, Creating Online Courses, Getting Started with Coaching. On Friday, I was able to listen to Turning Your Passions into Profit, Work at Home Possibilities, and How to Create Udemy Courses. Saturday brought me Proofreading and Editing, Website Design & Digital Services.

There were segments that I totally wanted to get the information from, but you know, laundry needed done, classes needed to be taught, and lunch needed prepared, so I didn’t get to them. If that happened to you, take heart. You can get LIFETIME access to all of the sessions plus bonus content for a fraction of what the material is worth. 

If you purchase today, you’ll get all this for just $67. If you wait until tomorrow, the price goes up. You have just until 9 PM EST for this pricepoint, so time is of the essence if you want in on this informative online Work Freedom summit for a reasonable price.

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Filed under Economics, Education, Employment, Teaching

Don’t Forget!!! Work Free Summit

Today, I’d like to take a few minutes and talk about why I love working from home and what my greatest challenges are. Most of you already know that I’ve been working at home for almost two years now and I absolutely love it!

I don’t have to get up before dark and brave the wet or cold on my moto to go to work, nor do I need to bundle up and come home in the rain or cold on my moto after dark. When it gets cold, and even though I live in Mexico, it does still get cold, I can take my laptop and set up in front of the fireplace and work in my sweater and slipper socks with my cup of tea beside me.

I also enjoy the income I earn online as compared to working for pesos in Mexico. Earning dollars means I don’t have to work nearly as many hours per week to provide for my family comfortably. I have flexibility in my schedule that I never had before. I was able to work and visit my family in Pennsylvania this year, which wouldn’t have been possible at any of the traditional jobs I’ve had over the years.

The challenges of working at home are challenges to be sure. The weather impacts my internet connection, so some days I can’t get everything I want to get done, done. I’ve had to cancel online classes because of poor internet connection as well. I’ve learned the best hours for full-power internet are early in the morning, so that’s when most of my online work happens. I need to be organized and ahead of the game so that in the event of an internet outage, I won’t be behind in my writing assignments either. Procrastination has had to be eliminated from my vocabulary in order for working from home to work.

I get to spend more time with my family working from home and I have more time to do the things I love. Right now, I’m going to finish up this post and take the Puppers for a walk in the middle of the day. When could I have done that working at a traditional job? I also get to enjoy my house. It’s been quite an adventure building it and instead of leaving it vacant for 8 – 10 hours a day, I can actually LIVE in it!

I want to help other women, especially those in Mexico, find similar opportunities to work from home, whether online or in another field. So remember that his week is the Work Freedom Summit that I participated in. While it will be available after this week, it won’t be available for FREE! So take advantage of this fabulous resource and sign up for your FREE access from October 24-26.

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Take a look at all the topics that will be covered!

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I can’t wait to see what you think of my segment on eBooks!

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Time for that walk!

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Filed under Blogging, Economics, Education, Teaching

Continuing with the Internet Crusade

So all of a sudden during a Tuesday morning class, neither internet was actually providing internet service. I had to put in an emergency absence form for the second half of the shift. The satellite internet hadn’t been working since late afternoon on the day before, so I had gone into the class knowing I didn’t have the backup. Then the Blue Communications internet just sputtered and died.

Unraveling this mess took more than a week. Beginning with the satellite internet, our regular monthly payment day is the 26th of the month. We normally pay it a day or so beforehand, but this month one thing after another kept us from actually paying it until the 26th. When we called to see why it wasn’t working after our payment, it seems that the contract had been signed on the 24th even though it hadn’t been installed until the 26th. Thus, the company decided we were delinquent in our payment on the 25th of this month and shut down service. Whatever. We were now current and on the 27th, we had satellite internet again.

Now for the Blue Communications internet story….

After trying to log in to the company site, we received an error message stating our SIM card was not functioning. This internet service uses a modem that uses something like cell phone signals to provide us internet way out in La Yacata. So since this was a SIM card issue, we took the modem to the office in Moroleon. We explained what the problem was and they started shaking their heads. We would need to call the technical service number for assistance. They couldn’t do a thing. The installer did plug it in at the office and verified that it wasn’t working correctly, but that was all. We asked whether they had another modem in the office in case the one we had couldn’t be fixed. I was assured that they did. I should have asked them to show it to me though.

Anyway, we went home with our modem and had my son call technical support. He was to be our representative in this matter for several reasons. One is my husband hasn’t a clue on internet/computer related gadgets. Secondly, though I do, I have difficulty understanding Spanish over the phone. So our teenage son took up the gauntlet.

Tuesday afternoon, he was on the phone over an hour doing troubleshooting. You know, move the modem here, press this button, now log in and tell me what it says. Nothing, ok, now reset this and reconnect that and tell me what is happening. Anyway, after all that, the tech confirmed that there was something wrong with the SIM card. He assured us that a report would be filed and that within 1-2 days, it would be resolved.

On Wednesday, the internet was still not working. So my son called again. He spoke to another tech person who said that no report had ever been filed on Tuesday. He assured us that the issue would be resolved in 1-2 days.

On Thursday, he called again. This time we instructed my son to say that it either gets fixed or we cancel the service. After being referred to a manager and then referred to that person’s manager, the cancelation request was finalized. I’d receive an email in 1-2 days to confirm that our contract had been canceled.

Meanwhile, on Friday we went to the office in Moroleon. We requested a new modem and a new contract. Now they didn’t have a modem for us. Huh! Go figure. If we would come back in the afternoon, they should get delivery by then. Meanwhile, they had a 5 MBPS modem that they could rent us. The owner had gone to the U.S. and didn’t want to let the contract lapse.

I told them that I wasn’t interested in that modem. Our modem had 10 MBPS and while it wasn’t consistent, when it worked, it worked well.

We returned that afternoon. Nope, no modem. Try back on Monday. On Saturday, the internet was working as well as it ever did. Good for a time, then dropping, sometimes coming back, sometimes not. So my weekend classes were not a bust after all. Plus, since the satellite internet was working again, I could do the ol’ switcheroo in the event one internet lost its signal.

On Monday, my husband went to check to see if the modem had arrived. The lady in the office gave him a hard time about canceling the previous service and trying to set up another one. I don’t understand why. We have no contract with Blue Communications. It’s set up on a month-to-month plan. The modem we bought outright. However since that particular modem was tied to that particular month-to-month service, in order to get a new modem, we had to cancel the old one.

Anyway, she told my husband to try the rental 5 MBPS modem out and see how that worked. So he brought it home and I used it to teach. It worked about as well as the other one. Only I still didn’t want to “rent” the modem. What happened when the owner decided to come back to Mexico? We’d be out of a modem.

My son called the support line again. He said that the person he spoke with this time apologized for the problems we’d been having as well as for her co-workers who didn’t seem to be able to figure out what they were supposed to do to file a report. Of course, no report of the internet outage had been filed for our account, nor any cancelation request sent through. As long as we paid our monthly fee tomorrow, the service would continue uninterrupted.

So we went back to the office in Moroleon to return the modem. We requested the deposit for the new modem and monthly contract back. Of course, they didn’t have the money.  The lady suggested that she could apply the balance to our monthly fees, which would pay us 3 months and change in advance. Well, it’s not what I had planned for that money, but I guess it would do. She gave me a piece of paper with words to that effect. 

Despite all of our precautions, the last day of our monthly plan, our internet service was cut off.  We learned an interesting tidbit. Once your account has been deactivated, you can not access the customer service line by entering your account number. It’s like blocked or doesn’t recognize it or something. So since we couldn’t get ahold of anyone by phone, we went back to the office in town. They said that our payment had been made and gave us a receipt. When I asked whether someone could call and find out what was wrong with our account, the service technician told me to send them an email insisting our service be fixed.

Umm, if I don’t have internet at home, how would I send an EMAIL which requires the INTERNET? Go to the Cybercafe and wait there for a response? So that was completely useless advice in my opinion.  Anyway, since the backup satellite internet was still chugging along, I had my son log on to the company website and chat with a representative. She told us that there had been no report made for service repair but there was a cancellation request. Válgame dios! (Oh my god!) She asked if we would like to reactivate our account and the next day we were back in business. Well, as much as we ever were with this internet provider.

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Filed under Economics, Employment, Teaching

The Internet Saga Part 3

That comment the satellite installation guy made about an antenna for the BlueComm modem put a bee in my bonnet. I checked the modem we had and most models came with those rabbit ear antennas–ours didn’t. They weren’t expensive, less than $20, so I thought I’d order some from Amazon.

Well, the company that sold them didn’t ship to Mexico. Ok, I’d have them shipped to my friend in the US and she could send them to us. It would be a small package, no big deal. Boy was I wrong!

She tried Fedex. She had added a few things to my care package, including makeup and a cloth quiver for my son’s arrows. She was told that anything manufactured in China cannot be sent to Mexico. Both the quiver and the antenna were manufactured in China. Then that personal items like makeup also could not be sent. She said she felt like I was in jail and unable to receive items. Sure enough, cosmetics are prohibited items along with Garbage Pail Kids Cards, you know those awful cards from the 80s with ugly drawings of children like Pikey Nose Marge. I was unable to find anything specific about imports from China being restricted although technically the antennas would fall under the electronic equipment category I expect.

My friend then tried the DHL office. This time she tried to send just the quiver and antenna, no other “personal effects.” Sure, they’d send it but it would cost $140 USD. Holy crap! (See DHL import guidelines)

The offical USPS site doesn’t list cosmetics or things made in China as prohibited, so that was her next attempt.  Success! The package with the antennas and quiver would cost $22 USD and be here in 4-6 weeks.  Well, of course, that doesn’t figure the gas shortage in large portions of Mexico. So I expect it will take longer. 

In the meantime, I’ve had to cancel my online classes. The unseasonable rains have affected both internet modems. I’m trying not to dwell on that lost income.

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Filed under Economics, Mail Service and Shipping in Mexico, Teaching