Natural Healing– Bugambilia

I’ve already mentioned that the bugambilia morada  (Bougainvillea glabra) can be used medicinally along with eucalyptus and aloe vera for cough treatment. Most often an infusion is used to treat asthma, bronchitis, whooping cough, and other respiratory conditions.

This lovely, bright plant, known as camelina in some parts of Mexico, has several other traditional uses as well. It has been used to treat dysentery, stomach pain, and skin blemishes.

Bougainvillea glabra is also known as the lesser bougainvillea or paperflower. The plant that appears to be full of purplish flowers actually has very small white or yellow flowers which are surrounded by colorful papery bracts. The video above shows a close-up of the actual flower.  The flowers of Bougainvillea glabra are used to treat low blood pressure in Panama.

The Bougainvillea glabra has anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. The leaves are effective in preventing dopamine-depleted neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease because of their antioxidant composition. The antioxidant component also has potential in the treatment of cancer.   

In addition, studies have shown that other varieties of the Bougainvillea species, mostly the Bougainvillea spectabilis, have antimicrobial, antidiabetic, antifertility, antihyperlipidemic, anti-atherogenic, antipyretic, anthelmintic, amylase inhibitors, thrombolytic, and analgesic properties, leading to the suggestion that the bougainvillea glabra be studied further in the future.

bougainvilia.jpg

I’ve found a few recipes that use bugambilia for cough remedies.

Recipe #1

Boil in one quart of water, reduce to simmer, then strain the herbs out.  Add limón and miel (honey) to taste. Sip as needed throughout the day.

Recipe #2

  • 2 parts gordolobo (common mullein) flowers
  • One part bugambilia bracts
  • One part manzanilla (German chamomile) flowers
  • One part jamaica (hibisucs) flowers
  • One part tomillo (thyme) leaves
  • Pinch of ground canela (cinnamon)

Boil the herbs together, strain, drink hot or cold with cinnamon for flavoring.

Recipe #3

Mix gordolobo (common mullein) and bugambilia bracts with tamarind juice, flavored with cinnamon and honey. Drink as needed.

Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to locate gordolobo in my area. I’m going to check with the herb seller at the tianguis in Uriangato next time I go. He’s got rattlesnake skin and armadillos shell, so the odds are in my favor he’ll have some.

I did prepare the simple infusion tea with just the bugambilia, however. It has a mild taste and a bright pink color.

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2 Comments

Filed under Native fauna and flora, Natural Healing

2 responses to “Natural Healing– Bugambilia

  1. Deborah S.

    Love the colour of the infusion tea!

    Liked by 1 person

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