Christmas in Mexico–Villancicos

singing to baby jesus.jpg

Villancicos are religious songs now primarily sung and performed during the Christmas season in Mexico. Quite a number of the villancicos played nowadays are just Spanish translated versions of English Christmas carols. However, there are some quite unique songs. Many of these songs came from Spain and were brought to Mexico during the conquest.

One of the songs that I was delighted to hear this past Christmas was  Los peces en el río en el río–literally The Fish in the River. The students at the school I work at did a delightful performance this past Christmas Event. Actually, they performed the song twice since there was no communication between the program coordinator and the music teacher prior to the evening’s performance. That does seem to happen a lot where I work. Anyway, in the song, the Virgin Mary calmly goes about her pre-birth preparations while fish jump in jubilation in the nearby river in anticipation of the event. She brushes out her hair, she washes the diapers and washes herself.

The English translations are my own, so it probably won’t match anything you might search out on Wiki. The translated versions I came across didn’t really make any sense.

Los peces en el río

La Virgen se está peinando
entre cortina y cortina.
Los cabellos son de oro
y el peine de plata fina.

The Virgin is combing her hair
you can see her between the curtains.
Her hair is golden
and the comb the finest silver.

ESTRIBILLO:
Pero mira cómo beben
los peces en el río.
Pero mira cómo beben
por ver a Dios nacido.
Beben y beben
y vuelven a beber.
Los peces en el río
por ver a Dios nacer.

CHORUS:
But look how they drink
the fish in the river.
But look how they drink
to see God born.
They drink, and they drink
and come back to drink some more,
the fish in the river,
to see God born.

La Virgen lava pañales
y los tiende en el romero,
los pajarillos cantando,
y el romero floreciendo.

ESTRIBILLO

The Virgin washes diapers
and hangs them on rosemary branches.
The little birds are singing
and the rosemary is blossoming.

CHORUS

La Virgen se está lavando
con un poco de jabón.
Se le han picado las manos,
manos de mi corazón.

ESTRIBILLO

The Virgin is washing herself
with a little bit of soap.
Her hands are irritated (or sore)
the hands of my love.

CHORUS

Another song that isn’t in your typical English Christmas carol list is Campana sobre Campana (The Bells of Bethlehem). Again, this song was repeated twice during the Christmas event at my school, but hey, who’s counting?

In this song, it talks about the bells of Bethlehem rung by angles when the Christ child was born. Of course, there is no more historical evidence for the heavenly bell ringing than the drinking fish of the previous song, but when has that ever stopped anyone?

Campana sobre Campana

Campana sobre campana
y sobre campana una
asómate a la ventana
verás a un niño en la cuna.


One bell after another
and after another–one (1 o’clock)
Come to the window
to see a child in the crib

(Coro)

Belén
Campanas de Belén
que los ángeles tocan
que nuevas me traéis.


Chorus:

Bethlehem
Bells of Bethlehem
that the angles ring
What news have you brought me?


Recogido tu rebaño
a donde vas pastorcillo?
Voy a llevar la portal
requesón, manteca y vino

(coro)

Among your flock (or with your flock)
where are you going little shepherd?
I’m taking the path (or way)
bringing cheese, lard, and wine.

Chorus

Campana sobre campana
y sobre campana dos
asómate a la ventana
porque esta naciendo Dios

(Coro)

One bell after another
and after bell –two. (2 o-clock)
Come to the window
because God is being born.

Chorus

Caminando a media noche
¿donde caminas pastor?
le llevo al niño que nace
como a Dios mi corazón

(coro)

Walking at midnight,
where are you walking to shepherd?
I bring my love to the child that
was born as God

Chorus

Campana sobre campana
y sobre campana tres
en una cruz a esta hora
del niño va a padecer

(Coro)

One bell after another
and after bell –three. (3 o-clock)
On a cross, at this hour
the child will suffer.

Chorus

I’m happy to report that the art of composing villancicos has not died out. I have been fortunate enough to work with maestro Sergio and have heard his original compositions performed. I hope you enjoy them as much as I have.

Video 1

Video 2

Video 3

disclosure

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Carnival posts, Mexican Holidays, Religion

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s