Surviving a Volcanic eruption in La Yacata

Mexico is crossed by the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, known also as the Sierra Nevada, which covers its central-southern section. Interestingly enough, this belt defies logic and does not run parallel to the Middle American Trench and many of the volcanoes are located at an angle to the highest peak in Mexico, Pico de Orizaba (18,491 feet), also known as Citlaltépetl which is currently dormant, but not extinct.

There are currently 43 active or dormant volcanoes listed for Mexico, but that’s not to say that one might not spring up in your back yard. That’s exactly what happened just a hop, skip, and jump away from La Yacata near Uruapan, Michoacan in 1943. It grew over a period of nine years, with lengthy periodic eruptions which completely destroyed the town of Parícutin. Three people were killed, not from lava, but after being struck by lightning generated by pyroclastic eruptions (See Surviving a lightning strike).

Other Mexican volcanoes that have erupted in the last 100 years include Volcano Barcena (1953), El Chichón (1982), Nevado de Colima (2016), Popocatépetl (2016), Socorro (1993), and the Tacaná Volcano (1986).

Of course, all of these eruptions may not be natural in origin. There is some speculation that aliens are controlling the timing and intensity of Popocatépetl‘s eruptions. (See Surviving UFO invasion in La Yacata)

So, being in the vicinity of active volcanoes (UFO triggered or not) means learning a bit about volcano safety.

The number one tip is to STAY AWAY FROM ACTIVE VOLCANOES!

It’s quite the thing to hike or climb the impressive peaks in Mexico with Iztaccihuatl being the most popular volcano to hike. However, as some of these are still active, they are technically closed for tourists. So don’t risk it.

More safety advice:

If you happen to be in your house and a volcano erupts near you, evacuate if you are in the direct path of lava, mudflows or flying rocks or debris. Before you leave the house, put on long-sleeved shirts and pants, wear eyeglasses or goggles, and put on an emergency mask or hold a damp cloth to your face.

Ash can damage vehicle engines, so avoid driving. If you must drive, stay below 35 miles per hour.

If you are not evacuating, close windows and doors and block chimneys to prevent ash from entering your home. Wear protective clothing when removing ash from your roof. Bring pets and livestock into closed and sheltered areas.

Stock up on the normal prepper supplies such as food and water. The effects of a volcanic eruption could last years leading to drought (See Surviving Drought), and civil unrest (See Surviving Martial Law). The great civilization that once inhabited Teotihuacan is thought to have been torn asunder after a massive volcano caused global climate change (See Surviving Global Climate Change) leading to an extended drought causing the starving inhabitants to overthrow its government. (See Teotihuacan)

Knowing what could happen and being prepared is half the battle when it comes to volcanic eruptions. The other part is just using old fashion common sense and staying the h*ll away from high-risk zones.  Of course, it’s come to my attention that we live closer to a high-risk zone than I previously thought.  In February 2017, a crater appeared in the small lake town of Cuitzeo, not so very far from La Yacata.  The ensuing dust cloud caused considerable health issues for residents and affected the air quality all the way to Moroleon for several weeks.

And then, of course, there is the suspicious amount of pumice stone found in La Yacata which makes me wonder if we are far enough away from a risk zone.  Well, I guess we’ll just have to take our chances on this one.

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This post was proofread by Grammarly.


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1 Comment

Filed under Battling Nature, Carnival posts, Safety and Security

One response to “Surviving a Volcanic eruption in La Yacata

  1. Pingback: A to Z Challenge Reflections | Surviving Mexico

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