Tag Archives: rosticeria

Buying Chicken in Mexico

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You can buy live fattened chickens where they advertise Venta de Pollo Gordo. You can get a chicken here for about $100 pesos. Some places will kill and pluck it for you for a higher price. Others won’t.

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So the next best bet is going to a pollería which gets its chickens from the chicken fattening places. These aren’t organic or free range chickens. If you want organic free-range chickens, you’ll have to raise them yourself but remember it’s much easier to eat them if you don’t give them names.

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Incubated hatched peeps can be bought in area from veterinarian/feed places. The last time we bought some, the price was 6 chicks for $100 pesos.

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At the pollería you can buy an entire chicken. The price will vary depending on the kilo size. An averaged size whole chicken currently is about $120 pesos. You can ask to have the chicken cut into smaller pieces, which is usually done with a huge pair of scissors or just buy 60 pesos of individual pieces which you can pick out yourself. You can also find raw chicken at places that advertise Pollo Fresco (fresh chicken), or at stands in the tianguis or markets.

If you want chicken already cooked, you can go to a rosticería and get rotisserie chicken or pollos a la leña which are cooked over the open flame. You can buy whole chickens, pieces of chickens as part of a combo, sometimes with rice and mole or floppy french fries, or an order of pescuezos (chicken necks).

You can also get “American style” or “Kentucky” chicken in our area, which is fried (empanizada). Unbelievably the family packs are often served with coleslaw. UGH! Fortunately for our family, if you ask they will substitute the coleslaw, which NOBOBY likes, for an extra wing.

Where do you get your chicken?

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Filed under Southern Comfort Food Mexican Style