Jolina’s Kids

We’ve been waiting since nearly the moment of conception for Jolina’s kids to be born. They finally arrived and what a story we have here. First, she was busy giving birth in the goat corral and the other nanny goats started head butting her. Jolina has never been accepted by the herd, probably because she is my husband’s favorite. 

If her stomach had allowed it, she would have been already outside the corral with Terry, but she hasn’t been able to do any acrobatics this last week. So my husband and son ran out to save the day. Jolina had a baby half-in, half-out, and scampered out of the corral as fast as her delicate state would let her. 

In short order, Joel and Nina (yes twins) arrived. Jolina had enough of that sort of stuff and ignored her kids for the next two hours. To be fair, she did have a fairly traumatic birth experience. That didn’t stop her from chowing down a good supply of alfalfa though. 

Papa Chivo, AKA my husband, finally held Jolina still so her kids could nurse. Twice more he went out and forced Jolina into submission. I told my husband that I thought Jolina was a dud when it came to motherhood. He was mortally offended. How dare I insult his favorite pet?

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Jolina doing what she does best–eat!

By morning, Jolina was responding to her kids’ cries. My husband tied her in the food corral (otherwise she’d eat everything in sight) and her kids figured out how to help themselves to the milk supply. 

joel and nina

Nina looks just like her mother and Joel looks like Grandaddy Elvis.

Joel and Nina have certainly inherited their mother’s propensity for hollering and her circus tricks. Not 20 minutes after birth, one of the twins was inside the barrica (barrel) set up as a barrier to keep Red from bothering them, while the other was pushing it along. Another rescue was in order before they headed over Niagara Falls in that barrel.

They are good sized and healthy. The only issue we have is where to keep them. Terry had to be moved to the new garden area last night because his hysterical antics were making Jolina even worse. Fuzz is on the back porch. The Puppers are in the back yard. The corral has been divided for Lady and the goats. Red has his own stall. We just don’t have the space for more animals right now! Well, I guess we’ll do what we can.

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The Gardening & Sustainable Living Bundle and The Foraging Course

Ultimate Bundles has put together an excellent resource this year with the Gardening & Sustainable Living Bundle. Originally, I thought it might be a little late in the growing season for some of the information, but with snow in May in a good section of the U.S., the growing season has just been moved forward a bit.

I know I’m worried about my family’s food supply in the upcoming months and have doubled my kitchen garden this year. I’m trying more container gardening and raised beds in our new little “greenhouse” area (which I’ll talk about once it is finally finished). I’ve planted melons, blue corn, peas, beans, squash, cilantro, chiles, tomatoes, and cucumbers. My husband says I’ve gone overboard. What can I say?

So since I’m trying some new techniques I was delighted to see some of the gems the Gardening & Sustainable Living Bundle contained when I ordered it last week.

The Gardening & Sustainable Living Bundle eCourses

First, let’s start with the eCourses. I’ve enrolled in From clove to stove: How to grow garlic by Tracy Lynn, Raised Bed Mini-Bundle: Plan, Build, Fill, Grow and Harvest from your own raised bed by Jill McSheehy and The Art of Sourdough by Victoria Pruett and can’t WAIT to get started!

In addition to these courses, there are several outstanding downloadable planners and guides as well as a canning recipe booklet. Then there are the 29 eBooks, which I must admit are my FAVORITE part of these Ultimate Bundles.

What's inside Herbs & Essential Oils Super Bundle

The Gardening & Sustainable Living Bundle is an incredible value on its own, but if you purchase it this week, you will ALSO get the chance to purchase the 2019 Herbs & Essential Oils Bundle with my eBook Exploring Traditional Herbal Remedies in Mexico included! This is the very LAST time the 2019 Herbs & Essential Oils Bundle will be offered through Ultimate Bundles, so don’t miss out.

Join us in The Foraging Course for just $39!

Herbal Academy is also offering a course that can increase your food stockpiles in these uncertain times. Enrollment for The Foraging Course begins now with the class start date of June 1. During the Early Bird Registration, this online five-lesson course is just $39.

We forage a good section of our food supply every year, including mushrooms in the rainy season, tunas and cactus in the dry, along with a number of other wild edibles found in La Yacata. If you want to take more control over your food sources, then this is an excellent class to begin with.

In The Foraging Course, you’ll

  • Discover commonly foraged edibles and wild herbs in class with 24 in-depth plant monographs
  • Use your harvest in 48 recipes including herbal preparations for your apothecary as well as nutritious and delicious breakfast, lunch, dinners, and (certainly not last!) desserts
  • Get to know plants up-close and personally in Herbal Academy’s guided videos

So once again, you can get The Gardening & Sustainable Living Bundle that includes 6 courses, 21 eBooks, 5 Planners and Printables  and you can enroll in The Foraging Course from Herbal Academy for just $39 from now until May 31st. All of these options can help you choose healthier options going forward as we negotiate the new post-virus realities, so what are you waiting for?

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Mother’s Day in Mexico in the Time of Coronavirus

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In Mexico, Mother’s Day is a big ta-doo. There are early morning serenades, flowers, family gatherings, and in the event that a mother has passed on, trips to the cemetery. Moroleon has specifically forbidden these activities this year. 

That doesn’t mean some families didn’t carry on as usual anyway, though it was more clandestine. It’s not like there is any real way the prohibition can be enforced. 

Take for example the fact that the churches have been closed in town. At least one group has moved their services out here to La Yacata. So every Saturday evening we hear some chanting, singing, and even some trumpet blowing from the house at the corner. I think it might be an Episcopalian group. We practice social distancing and reroute our dog walk during services, so I can’t be sure. 

Since parties are a no-go in town, again, family gatherings, including Mother’s Day celebrations,  were moved to La Yacata. The dogs didn’t get their afternoon walk on Sunday because of all the roving children and drunk adults. 

Which brings me to another matter. Moroleon has enacted La Ley Seca (the dry law) which is in force usually only right before an election. All sales of alcohol were prohibited in town beginning May 8 until May 30. Yet, people still found a way to get enough alcohol to get liquored up. 

There is a potential shortage of alcohol looming because the beer manufacturers were declared non-essential and closed in April. The very determined, however, will be able to get pulque which the old women still make in nearby La Barranca. 

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Moroleon followed the prohibition of alcohol sales and serenades with another one-two punch. All non-essential businesses must close, including the textile factories, on May 11, until the end of the month. Without the textiles, well, Moroleon is in big trouble financially. 

These prohibition and closure dates are based on the premise that the peak contagion for COVID-19 will happen between May 5 and 11. Yet, now, the date has been changed with the latest figures to May 20 although social distancing requirements are supposed to be lifted on May 17 in most of the country and on May 30 for the rest of the states. 

What this means is anyone’s guess. For now, the number of confirmed cases and deaths is still rising in Mexico. Medical personnel is the highest at-risk population. In fact, 42% of the patients in the state of Nayarit are hospital workers, which is worrisome. The actual death toll in the epicenter Mexico City may be much higher than reported. 

And yet, there are still conspiracy theorists even in Mexico. One hospital was stormed by about 300 people in an apparent “rescue” attempt believing the virus to be a government plot to kill people. Medical personnel is still being attacked and murdered as the supposed harbingers of death rather than essential workers. 

With all these shenanigans, Mother’s Day in our home was a quiet affair, no different from any other day. We’ll stay home and ride out the pandemic one day at a time, however long that takes.

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Filed under Cultural Challenges, Health, Mexican Holidays, Safety and Security